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Avenue Reine Astrid · 118
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FAQs

Accessibility

  • Having your website labelled is a choice, not an obligation. Just as you can grow vegetables organically without having an organic label, you can have a website developed that meets all accessibility standards without having it labelled. The advantage of having a label, however, is that you can easily present a detailed list of the criteria you check off to the public. The list is clear and publicly accessible, and anyone can agree or disagree with the facts.

    We make this point because, like any label, AnySurfer comes at a price – which depends on the complexity of the site being analysed.

    Depending on whether it is a small, medium or complex website, the budget for audits (first and follow-up audits, plus reports) varies roughly between €1,500 and €4,500.

    AnySurfer will provide you with a customised quote for each request. Just ask them.

  • The AnySurfer label can be applied to three types of entities: a website, a web agency (a company), a web developer (a person).

    The label certifies that AnySurfer has assessed the accessibility of the site (WCAG 2 level A, AA or AAA), or the ability to produce accessible websites (for agencies and developers). A status page summarises the accessibility level information, the date, etc. It’s a little bit like your diploma!

    Getting a website labelled is a process that can start at several points in the project.

    The easiest: think about it first

    Whether you take a training course to do it yourself, or are accompanied by a certified company, thinking about accessibility upstream is a time (and money) saver. Your website and its functionalities will be designed with all the required parameters already in place – so there will be nothing to redo or rework afterwards. At each stage, accessibility is checked and a final audit is carried out to confirm the level of accessibility.

    You can also have tests carried out during the project to ensure that you are on the right track.

    Getting the label for an already existing website

    Ordering an audit for a website that has already been completed and launched is of course feasible (and recommended in all cases), but if accessibility was not a topic during its development, you can expect longer costs and redevelopment times.

    The process is simple: you order an audit from AnySurfer, which carries out the tests and then provides you with a report. This report calls for adaptations, which are tested once they have been made. A new report is produced, which may call for adaptations, which are tested, etc., until the adjustments to the site reach the desired level of accessibility.

    Only with the green light from AnySurfer can you display the logo on your page.

    For professionals

    For agencies and web developers, obtaining the label (i.e. proving their ability to produce accessible websites) is done through training, followed by practical implementation of accessible websites. Finally, they have a mission to promote digital accessibility to their clients and partners.

     

    In short, how do you get labelled? Simply contact AnySurfer to request an audit of the site once it is completed.

  • In Belgium, AnySurfer is the officially recognised label for accessibility.

    Beyond this label, several organisations offer audits of websites or mobile applications to measure their level of accessibility (Eleven Ways, Five Oaks, etc.)

    On the basis of these reports, and considering that the next step is to make your website/application compliant, you can draw up an accessibility declaration.

    This document is a page of your website or application that honestly details the level of accessibility of your tool, how and on what basis you have established it, what you plan to do to address short or long term weaknesses, and who can be contacted by someone who does not understand it.

    You can consult the BOSA declaration assistant (in French) or the W3C declaration assistant for example.

    Finally, if you prefer not to embark on any of these procedures but are curious about the level of accessibility of one of your pages, you can use the BOSA Accessibility Check (page in French but tool in several languages), a small tool which quickly indicates the number of errors and remarks for a given page and details for each one what is causing concern. This tool is not as good as an in-depth report or analysis by a professional, but it will give you an idea of the extent of what you have to do.

  • Of course! The label serves to quickly and clearly show what you are complying with and to what extent – it is proof that you have gone the extra mile.

    However, you can choose to ignore it and be satisfied with a training course that you implement on your site, or with a more or less thorough audit accompanied by a statement detailing everything that you implement, why and how.

    Being labelled is not compulsory, it is an official recognition of your thoughts on accessibility. What really counts is what you put behind it, your convictions, your commitments and your actions. If you want to be accessible, that already changes a lot.

  • As we explain on the dedicated page here, there are at least four (4) good reasons to develop an accessible website or mobile application:

    • expand your audience – with an accessible site, you can really think that 100% of your target audience is seeing, reading, or listening to you
    • improve your SEO – anything you do to increase the accessibility of your website will help your SEO
    • build your (brand) image – to put it quickly, it’s a good point to have an accessible digital platform
    • apply the rules – it’s now the law that all public websites and applications must comply with accessibility requirements. Don’t wait for the same to happen in the private sector to get up to speed

    More information on accessibility

  • Yes and no. Accessibility is mostly about common sense.

    Imagine an extreme situation – a well-intentioned person tries to read your “about” page. His or her glasses are all fogged up and you’ve written everything in tiny, light grey on a white background, with no distinction between headings, paragraphs, links, buttons. You missed.

    This same person is dying to listen to the interview with your CEO, but a brass band has gone upstairs with him or her in the metro. The video has no subtitles? Wrong again.

    Decidedly passionate, this person is interested in a particularly relevant infographic posted the day before on your site. Bad luck, his or her smartphone is scratched and no longer renders colours accurately… Without a good caption to keep it understandable, your infographic is useless.

    Three far-fetched examples, but one reality: an accessible site is one where the elements can be interpreted by the greatest number of people. Can’t see the image? It must have a caption. Can’t hear the video? It must have a subtitle. Don’t know where to click? The button should stand out and clearly indicate what it does. The characters are unreadable? It should be possible to enlarge it, or it should stand out from the background. And so on.

    Accessibility is not so complicated, it requires thinking about what to put, where, and why. And for each element, to ask yourself: is it readable? Audible? Visible?

    Here you will find some initial tips on how to write a page correctly. For a complete and exhaustive version, we invite you to read the WCAG 2 here in English.

Chèques Entreprises

  • In order to benefit from the Walloon Region’s Chèques Entreprises subsidies, you must first be a company with its main operating headquarters in the Walloon Region. The main place of business is the place where the company employs the most workers.

    Secondly, this company must meet at least one of the following conditions:

    • be an SME (employs less than 250 people and has an annual turnover of less than 50 million euros, or a balance sheet total not exceeding 43 million euros) or a self-employed person
    • be a start-up: a company registered with the Crossroads Bank for Enterprises for less than 5 years
    • be a “project holder“: one or more persons presenting a project leading to the creation or takeover of a company whose place of operation is/will be located in Wallonia (includes self-employed persons in a complementary capacity)
    • be a non-profit organisation with an economic vocation (new in 2022). The not-for-profit organisation is subject to VAT; it employs at least 1 person bound by an employment contract; it has a goods or services activity on a given market; it has public funding of less than 50% (excluding employment aid, on the basis of the latest approved accounts)

    Does your company fit into any of the above descriptions? Then we can submit an Enterprise Cheque application for you.

  • Spade can introduce the file for you thanks to its secure “Provider” access on the Chèques Entreprises platform.

    To submit a file, we need your company number: the file must be linked to the Crossroads Bank for Enterprises. When we encode the file on the platform and it is submitted, its status is “awaiting validation”.

    A series of documents must be provided to the administration:

    • Cheque request to be signed
    • Agreement to be signed
    • De minimis certificate for SMEs
    • Declaration on honour for non-profit organisations
    • Any additional documents depending on the cheque chosen

    When your file is complete, you give it to us and we do the administrative work. Of course, as soon as we have news, we will let you know!

  • Once the grant application has been submitted (completed with all the required documents signed), it takes a few working days to get a response (no more than a week). This delay depends mainly on the number of applications to be processed by the administration, but our experience has shown us that we mostly receive an agreement within 5 working days.

    The SPW EER (Service Public de Wallonie – Économie, Emploi, Recherche) may request additional information to assess the file. Remember that a complete file (all documents clearly identified and filled in) and of good quality (clearly and sincerely explain your approach) is a file that is processed more quickly!

    In all cases, the mission can only start after obtaining the administration’s agreement. Once the agreement has been received, the beneficiary (you) is asked to pay its share (the 10 to 25% of the invoice amount that is not covered by the Walloon Region) directly to the administration. Then the mission can begin.

  • It’s the measure of your organisation’s “level” on a digital medium.

    Digital maturity thus observes the fluidity, ergonomics, level and ease of interaction with your users. It also looks at the range of services and information available online and the variety and quality of content. Finally, it takes into account the level of protection and security of your platform and its overall digital environment.

    Spade has developed a strong experience in the analysis of the existing situation and the optimization of digital processes. This results in a sharpened method to implement concrete actions and improve your digital maturity. As the concept is very broad, our support addresses its different aspects one by one. Depending on the level of the existing situation, we can adapt it by putting more emphasis where necessary.

  • The Chèques Entreprises is a helping hand from the Walloon Region to improve the digital aspect of your professional activity. The Region’s intervention aims to ensure that Walloon companies implement a good digital strategy. It supports them by financing their reflection and the establishment of an action plan. If your digital strategy were a house, this would be the time to choose the best site for building it and to draw up the plans: the basis for a quality construction to serve you and your ambitions.

    Carrying out this stage of thinking and planning is a job that many professionals in Wallonia do every day. Chèques Entreprises allows you to surround yourself with these experts to set up your digital eco-system and develop the digital maturity of your company.

    The Chèques Entreprises are a gateway to these professionals: financial assistance to go and see them with peace of mind and take full advantage of their skills. With an intervention of 75 to 90% of the cost of their mission, it is a great opportunity to develop your digital projects on a solid and sustainable basis.

    Spade and the Chèques Entreprises

    Spade is a Chèques Entreprises certified expert for the digital part. You can therefore get funding from the Walloon Region to benefit from our services, as long as it concerns digital projects.

    Whether you are self-employed or a large team, have a small or very comfortable budget, have very specific needs or vague ideas, every project starts from a situation.

    We map out that situation. Let’s define where you can go, what you’ll need to do it and what your limits are. We ask about your audience: who will you talk to? Who will use your services, go to your website? What will they be looking for and what will you provide them with as a result? How will your pages be constructed? What will be the layout of your site, the type of content to be produced? What schedules should be established to ensure a regular and quality feed?

    These are many questions but the answers are not far away – and we tell you, the Region is funding you to take the time to answer them.

    Take advantage of it!

    Find out more about Spade’s Chèques Entreprises.

General

  • First of all, thank you for your interest in our company!
    Secondly, you can feel free to send us an email on the general mailbox – info@spade.be – it will not be lost in the stream, it only allows us to centralise the requests and redirect you to the most relevant person in our team to answer your questions.

    If you prefer to ask your questions in person, you can also call us on +32 2 721 61 72

    Finally, if you are passing through Namur or Brussels, and outside of the Covid restrictions of course, come and see us!
    (Brussels : Rue Vanderschrick 85 / Namur : Avenue Reine Astrid, 118)

  • Yes, and you are in the right place!

    If we have not been clear enough on the other pages, we will be happy to explain everything to you personally. But first, and so that we can give you the most appropriate help, tell us what’s your project, what’s your activity ?

    There are many ways to reach us: by email, by phone or in person, don’t be afraid! We are just curious to meet you.

Internship

  • Spade is looking for passionate and creative students who are not afraid of a challenge. You must be open to new technologies, to tools that are different from those you may be used to working with, to a method of working in a team that is not yet known. You enjoy the company of fellow workers, you are conscientious in taking notes and you like to structure your work.

    We do not expect the trainee to send an application without at least a web portfolio: it is his/her best “business card” to convince us!

     

  • Your position will be either at Spade’s Brussels office, in the heart of Saint-Gilles (a few minutes walk from Brussels South Station and the Porte de Hal metro station), or at Spade’s Namur office in the TRAKK.

    Generally, development-oriented jobs or internships take place in Brussels, and design-oriented ones in Namur. Project managers are split between the two sites.
    In view of the current health circumstances, the above lines are bound to be regularly reinterpreted – we will therefore discuss them with you when the time comes.

  • At Spade, everyone has their own speciality but we all work as a team with complementary roles. We have project managers, designers and illustrators, front-end and back-end developers. We all have our affinities, for languages, audiovisuals, a type of illustration, a type of development, a type of project, a deeper knowledge of this or that. All of this makes for a rich and happy mix that is very useful for dealing with the most varied of demands.

    We are focused most of the time, but in a cordial atmosphere. We respect each other’s silence and code, but good humour and mutual understanding are the order of the day. Eating a sandwich together at lunch and sometimes enjoying a local beer or listening to a musical find together is also part of the Spade experience. We share news and discoveries via Slack, we are a group, and it’s everyone’s responsibility to contribute to its life.

  • We are looking for trainees who have completed at least one year of training in development, design, communication and/or marketing.

  • An internship at Spade lasts a minimum of 10 weeks. This is at least enough time for your potential to develop in the Spade working methodology. In 10 weeks, we can take the time to train you and you to apply what you have learned.

    On average, an internship lasts between two and a half and three months.

    Sometimes the trainee likes it so much that it seems impossible to leave… some have ended up as employees, either temporarily or for an indefinite period.

  • An internship at Spade is in fact an excellent asset for getting a position on the job market. As a full member of the team during your internship, you will experience what is expected of a professional, and therefore at a sufficient level.

    If we don’t have a job opening after your time with us, you will have great references to show for your skills elsewhere. Some of our interns have been hired by our clients, others have gone further afield. The internship is also a way for you to test what you need!

Jobs

  • Your position will be either at Spade’s Brussels office, in the heart of Saint-Gilles (a few minutes walk from Brussels South Station and the Porte de Hal metro station), or at Spade’s Namur office in the TRAKK.

    Generally, development-oriented jobs or internships take place in Brussels, and design-oriented ones in Namur. Project managers are split between the two sites.
    In view of the current health circumstances, the above lines are bound to be regularly reinterpreted – we will therefore discuss them with you when the time comes.

  • At Spade, everyone has their own speciality but we all work as a team with complementary roles. We have project managers, designers and illustrators, front-end and back-end developers. We all have our affinities, for languages, audiovisuals, a type of illustration, a type of development, a type of project, a deeper knowledge of this or that. All of this makes for a rich and happy mix that is very useful for dealing with the most varied of demands.

    We are focused most of the time, but in a cordial atmosphere. We respect each other’s silence and code, but good humour and mutual understanding are the order of the day. Eating a sandwich together at lunch and sometimes enjoying a local beer or listening to a musical find together is also part of the Spade experience. We share news and discoveries via Slack, we are a group, and it’s everyone’s responsibility to contribute to its life.

Website

  • Yes, and you are in the right place!

    If we have not been clear enough on the other pages, we will be happy to explain everything to you personally. But first, and so that we can give you the most appropriate help, tell us what’s your project, what’s your activity ?

    There are many ways to reach us: by email, by phone or in person, don’t be afraid! We are just curious to meet you.

  • Absolutely, it’s our core business !

    Spade has been developing websites on various media since 2011, and has so far supported companies and organisations of all sizes, with the most diverse challenges and ambitions.

    We make simple and complex sites, multi-sites, intranets and extranets, site takeovers; we know how to integrate a design on an existing site or, on the contrary, how to develop a site on which a design that we did not create will be applied; we know how to make applications; how to manage very large flows of simultaneous visitors; we can conceptualise, develop and accompany your project from A to Z or intervene only punctually according to the needs.

    In short, we know how to adapt (to you), and we do it with pleasure.

    Visit our different services

  • First of all, what is an eco-responsible website?

    It is a site that is resource-efficient from its design to its operation. In the face of current environmental concerns, digital pollution is also being called into question. Indeed, for a while, it was claimed that the ecological impact of many services was reduced by dematerialising exchanges, transactions, etc. Recently, however, we have realised that if we no longer send a document on paper, for example, or if we no longer print this document, we will instead store emails on a server which represents a far from insignificant energy expenditure and pollution impact. This is just one example among many to underline the fact that the web is not left behind in the current trend, and that mentions of eco-responsible, sustainable, green sites, etc. are multiplying.

    Several search engines explain how they ‘offset’ their energy consumption by sponsoring associations or sustainable actions. You will also find a number of sites that allow you to rate the eco-responsibility of your website, providing advice and some good habits to reduce your impact. The main points observed are the following

    • page complexity (i.e. the number of elements to be displayed on a page)
    • Bandwidth requirements (a high definition video requires more bandwidth than a standard block of text for example)
    • server load (i.e. the number of HTTP requests sent by the site to solicit connections to third parties, information, etc.)

    Is it possible to have a full eco-responsible site?

    Not really. Despite what you may read here and there, the web currently consumes energy, both for the manufacture of the devices that allow access to it (smartphones, computers, tablets, etc.) and for the storage and transfer of the data that make it interesting (cables, servers to be designed and then cooled, etc.). Let’s not even talk about the end of life of all these materials and the waste production that this causes – that’s another subject.

    Being aware of this is important. But it is already a good thing and with this in mind, action is possible. While it is a lie to claim to produce a “green” website, it is indeed possible to reduce its energy consumption – and thus make it more energy and environmentally friendly.

    A first and not least important step is to work on the accessibility of its pages. Having a standardised and good-sized typography, simple elements with little interaction, strong colour contrasts, etc., are key elements to make a website accessible. The good news is that these are also positive points for reducing consumption.
    Limiting the number of plugins, reducing the weight of images, not multiplying useless elements and superfluous developments, emptying your caches, are also important elements – and which, beyond the “ecological” aspect of your site, will quite simply improve its performance (accelerated page loading speed, for example) and readability.
    Remember that any digital action is polluting (sending an email, making a LinkedIn post or entering a search in an engine). So, when setting up your strategy, focus on quality rather than quantity. If you’ve already read this somewhere, it’s because it’s also the basis for effective communication.

    We would like to stress one point: it is only about reducing, not greening, a practice that does not know how to be green – at least at the time of writing this article. Finally, note that all the advice on reducing the impact of your site is also advice on improving the quality of your architecture, your campaigns, the performance of your pages and the relevance of your tools.

    A number of web professionals are trying initiatives to develop more “responsible” sites, hosting sites on less energy consuming machines, etc. At Spade, we work to develop efficient and effective tools for you, we make accessible websites, which we want to be sustainable, without unnecessary frills. As an agency, we see ourselves as prescribers of these good practices, we want to continue to strive for an ideal website. We are doing our best, and have for example recently joined the professional ambassadors of responsible digital, by signing the Charter of Responsible Digital. It’s a signature on a piece of paper, of course, but it’s a step we wanted to take to motivate us to continue in this direction!

  • Of course!

    We have code geniuses who can talk to machines… More seriously, data migration is indeed a possible operation and one that we carry out from time to time.

    Only from time to time, because when you want a new site, you generally want to modify, move things around, change the shape and look of the containers, and therefore the contents.

    Thus, recovering old articles as archives is of course possible (and often desirable). But before trying to recover all the information from your old site, take the time to think about the new one: do you want to see the same turns of phrase? The same blocks of text? The same images in the same places?

    Maybe there will be some rewriting, maybe you’ll want to change everything. Having a new website is a bit like moving house: there are things you take with you and keep for the long term, and then there are things you’d rather leave in your old flat because they’ll look out of place in the new one.

    There’s no need to worry too much about this part in any case, the question of content and its migration only comes later in the process of creating a site. Let’s start by discussing the new medium you need!

  • If we could answer this question in two words, we would either be liars or powerful soothsayers!
    Being neither, we can only play the honesty card: it depends.
    A website is like a house. You can have a small bungalow or a huge villa with all the comforts. It’s still a house, but it doesn’t have the same price.

    It’s not so much the number of pages that makes a website expensive, but its complexity and the level of interaction/animation that is desired.
    Does it require links to external platforms or servers? What type(s) of information and data must pass through, and what interactions are expected with them?
    What is the complexity of the modules that will have to compose it (do you want a simple photo or should it be animated with effects? Do you want a simple list or a filtering system with several entries? Etc.).

    To give a very broad range (which would then look more like a rake), a team of professionals can start providing a functional website (very basic, but with a clean design) from 3,000 euros. Some particularly complex sites will cost between 10 and 20 times that amount.
    The average, however, for a website that is ergonomic, aesthetic, well thought out (with workshops in addition to design and development), with simple animations and built with a Content Management System that allows you total autonomy in managing it and building new pages, is around 15,000 euros.

    Please note that these are only averages, estimates, all estimates are different. The best way to find out how much a website costs is to ask us the question and describe your wishes. Then we can give you a good answer. And only then can you make a good decision.

  • Why make specifications ?

    The specifications are a document that sets the framework for the realisation of any project (writing, building, design, development, maintenance, etc.). Writing one allows the person/service provider to whom you entrust the project to have all the cards in hand to carry it out according to your expectations. The more precise it is, the closer the result will be to your expectations.

    Note, however, that the more precise it is, the more confident you should be: too much precision prevents the professional you call upon from proposing alternatives that might in fact be more interesting / better thought out / more practical. It is not for nothing that you call on an external person to carry out this or that, so remember to give them the opportunity to express their suggestions and alternative proposals (with reasons, however).

    How do you draw up specifications?

    Work on the specifications necessarily begins with a stage of introspection: rethink who you are, what you do, what you aim to achieve; why you are asking for the creation/design of such and such a tool or service; what you expect from this tool or this service; etc. These elements are essential.

    Sometimes the specifications stop there, adding only administrative and legal information: who to contact; location of the service; requirements for submitting a bid and conditions for its acceptance; methods for selecting the service provider; intellectual property mentions; etc.

    Most often, however, it goes on and lists the expectations. In the case of a website or mobile app, you will then specify the technical and practical functionalities desired. For example, you want to have a map to show several points on it; have a specific animation effect; you need keyword search, filters; you want users to be redirected to such and such a place; you need there to be a link to such and such a database related to your business; you know you will need to load a certain type of media; etc.

    Detail the environment in which the product/service/website must fit (other parent sites? Social networks? Existing extranet / intranet? Etc.)

    You can then compare with the blocking or missing elements of your current platform if it exists – making comparisons or proposing references is always a plus and allows you to refine your proposal even more. So if you have seen a feature or effect on another platform that you like, put the link in your CDC, to show what you are talking about.

    After the features, you should indicate whether there is already a logo and graphic charter developed and to be integrated, or whether it is to be created from scratch, or whether, as an alternative, these elements exist on paper but need to be adapted to digital (which will require a redesign).

    Finally, and ideally, specify the desired post-launch maintenance time and the lifespan of the project. Will it be an event-related site – so with a limited lifespan, or a corporate site for the next 10 years? Do you want to take care of the hosting or leave it to your future provider?

    Depending on the project, a CDC can be long, very long, or even very very long. Don’t be afraid to list all the background information, questions and expectations – the providers who will respond to your CoC are there to answer your questions and provide solutions. The more specific you are in your request, the more concrete and relevant what will be presented to you will be (both in terms of functionality and in terms of the budget and schedule announced).

    If, however, you are still nervous about the idea of starting this project, we can also help you establish what you need to put in the CDC so as not to forget anything. Just contact us!

  • The User eXperience (UX) of your platform is a subtle mix of ergonomics, aesthetics and usefulness of what you offer to your users. In other words, it is one of the elements that will make them come back to your page with pleasure or not, recommend it, cite it as an example, or avoid it as much as possible.

    As consultation practices evolve regularly, one cannot judge that a UX is definitely the right one and never touch it again.

    There are, of course, some basic precepts and some unavoidable elements (a button must look like a button, for example, whatever its position or the ease with which the user clicks on it). But precisely, will what will seem obvious to someone who is very familiar with your environment be obvious to someone who is more distant from such and such a practice? Not sure, and that’s where the UX Design experts come in.

    Indeed, improving the UX of your platform already means asking yourself a number of questions about who the main users of your site/app are, what they are looking for, and what you expect from them in terms of interaction and action. For example, if it is imperative that people on your site read the 4 lines of explanation before clicking on the “next” button, then this button should be placed below the 4 lines, not above.

    This may seem like a no-brainer, but it’s a thousand little details like this that make your platform UX friendly, or not.

    To test and improve the experience on your tool, there is nothing like calling on professionals who will have an outside view and the right ideas to improve the existing one!

  • Web accessibility means access to web content for all people (including those with visual or hearing disabilities, etc.), regardless of the media (mobile, tablet, etc.) and the environment  (noise level, lighting, etc.). The challenge is therefore to take into account all the conditions of consultation when creating the website and its content.

    The very definition implies that a good accessible site is designed with this in mind from the very first stages. In fact, the accessibility of a site will be determined at various levels:

    • in the structuring of the navigation and the architecture of the website in an easily understandable way (sitemap)
    • in the choice of colors and shapes of elements, buttons, content blocks, graphic designs, etc. (UX and UI design)
    • in the way text content is written: the shorter it is, the easier it is for any user to understand; adopt a clear hierarchy of titles, subtitles, body text, etc.
    • in the detail given to visual media (images and videos): avoid illustrations with text included (unreadable for both a browser and a visually impaired person); fill in
    • alternative texts for images, insert subtitles in videos, etc.

    To judge the accessibility of your site, think of extreme situations – a person with foggy glasses on a crowded and noisy public transport, reaching out to try to read your latest news on their smartphone with a broken screen. If your page passes this test, you’re there!

    In Belgium, the AnySurfer label distinguishes accessible platforms. To obtain this label, you have to apply for it and then, depending on the diagnosis, make the necessary adaptations.

    Bonus: having an accessible website seems complicated to you? It’s a trick you’ll have to take, and you’ll see: an accessible site is a site that the search engines will find more easily… so it’s also a guarantee of a better SEO!

  • The CMS (Content Management System) is a software that supports the content of the website. It allows the design of the site itself, then the management and production of the content that makes it up.

    There are a certain number of them, among which we find the best known such as Joomla, Drupal, Wix or WordPress. In 2021, WordPress was considered the most widespread CMS in the world, used for about 43% of websites. (Source)

    Since its inception, Spade has developed an expertise in the WordPress CMS, creating an additional layer in the working environment for this CMS that facilitates its use and further increases its usability – this space, its features and its modules is called Minotaur.

    This affinity with the WordPress environment does not prevent us from working on projects using other CMS – either directly or via the intervention of partners specialising in other solutions.

    In short, as long as a site can be coded in PHP and using a MySQL database, we can support you.

  • Good question and good answer ! Yes, they are still websites, but they are different kinds of websites – and some have several names for one thing.

    A corporate site, also called an institutional site, is a site that presents a company, organisation or institution in a general way to the public. It is not (officially) aimed at a particular target group or its usual customers.

    A showcase site is a form of corporate site, in the sense that it is simply the window of a company in the same way as the window of a shop: it presents what the company is and what it does. Unlike an e-commerce site (or merchant site, or online shop or e-shop), the showcase site does not allow direct online transactions (which does not prevent the showcase site from being linked to an e-commerce page).

    An extranet is halfway between a public website and an intranet. It is a site with secure access, allowing its owner (a company, for example) to authorise access to the available data only to a specific category of people (some of its customers, partners, suppliers, for example), who are nonetheless external to its organisation (they are not its employees).

    An intranet is the most “restricted” version of the Internet site, since it is intended for and accessible only to the internal members of an organisation (sometimes even only within the physical walls of the organisation, although this is less true with the development of teleworking). Access to it is subject to membership of the company, usually secured by a password.

    A website, which brings together all the above versions: it is a set of online pages linked together by hyperlinks and hosted under a domain name on a server. The website address (the URL) is the home page of the site, designed to be the first page visited and which, like the entrance hall of a house, leads to the other pages.

    Spade develops platforms of all these different types according to your needs.

Workshops

  • Yes, and you are in the right place!

    If we have not been clear enough on the other pages, we will be happy to explain everything to you personally. But first, and so that we can give you the most appropriate help, tell us what’s your project, what’s your activity ?

    There are many ways to reach us: by email, by phone or in person, don’t be afraid! We are just curious to meet you.

  • Fortunately, these days, no!

    All the physical materials (paper, pencils, boards, cards, etc.) that we use in workshops also exist online.

    We know how to organize workshops entirely by videoconference, divide the group into sub-groups for reflection, bring everyone together to debrief, create and co-create together, visualise progress, ensure that everyone can express themselves, etc. All within the time constraints of the workshop.

    All this while respecting time and result constraints.

    See you soon in our workshops!

  • It won’t be necessary!

    The workshops we have developed are each focused on a specific need, and therefore linked to a stage in the life of your project.

    If you are starting from scratch or want to wipe the slate clean and redo everything, this is not the same as wanting to redesign an element, add an e-commerce site or change the design of a page. Nor is it the same as aligning with new legislation on personal data, upgrading in terms of accessibility or changing a particular navigation element.

    Depending on your liabilities, where you are starting from and what you want to achieve, we will offer you the right workshop(s) to take you where you want to go. To do this, first of all, tell us where you are, describe your situation and your desires!

  • The workshops are facilitated by at least two members of the Spade team.

    You will always have the Project Manager present, who follows you throughout the project and makes sure that information is not lost along the way.

    Depending on the type of workshop or the needs of the project, you may have a UX Design expert, a Developer, a Designer or a Facilitator present to lead the discussions.

    The workshops are facilitated using several online or physical tools, reflection supports, papers, markers, card games, etc. We provide all materials for all participants in the workshops we facilitate.

    See all workshops

  • Our workshops each last half a day (at least 3 hours).

    Where several workshops are planned we do not do more than one per week, to allow time for ideas to infuse and for reflection to take place – we do not want to rush things unnecessarily and risk regrets later.

    See all types of workshops we propose.

  • It’s the measure of your organisation’s “level” on a digital medium.

    Digital maturity thus observes the fluidity, ergonomics, level and ease of interaction with your users. It also looks at the range of services and information available online and the variety and quality of content. Finally, it takes into account the level of protection and security of your platform and its overall digital environment.

    Spade has developed a strong experience in the analysis of the existing situation and the optimization of digital processes. This results in a sharpened method to implement concrete actions and improve your digital maturity. As the concept is very broad, our support addresses its different aspects one by one. Depending on the level of the existing situation, we can adapt it by putting more emphasis where necessary.

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